One-wipe cleaning system in hospitals proven to be effective

Source: Flickr

According to Infection Control Today (2018), a recent study carried out in a hospital in the UK has determined that a “one wipe” cleaning system was proven to be more effective than the traditional “two wipes” system in reducing the risk of MRSA in hospitals. Between 2013-2016, the hospital had been using a “two wipe” system, which consisted of first using a detergent wipe and then using an alcohol wipe as a disinfectant. In May 2016, a universal cleaning and disinfection wipe was introduced to the healthcare facility, and it made a significant difference.

According to Infection Control Today (2018),

“Using a Poisson model the researchers demonstrated that the average hospital acquisition rate of MRSA/100,000 patient bed days reduced by 6.3 percent per month after the introduction of the new universal wipe.”

Infection Control Today (2018)

These results were significant, and led to a big change in how this UK healthcare facility cleans its equipment. Not only did the universal disinfectant wipes lead to higher efficacy, but they also led to higher efficiency, since healthcare workers now only have to go over the equipment once and are assured that it will be clean.

Keeping this in mind, there are many different types of disinfectant wipes to choose from. If you would like to learn more about different types of disinfectant wipes, and how each of them work, feel free to visit our official website, and view our product offerings, or contact us directly by phone or email.

Click on the link below to view our product offerings for disinfectant wipes.

http://www.lalema.com/catalog/disinfecting-wipers-101

Source:

https://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/environmental-hygiene/simple-one-wipe-system-cleaning-nurses-effective-strategy-researchers-say

https://www.healthcarefacilitiestoday.com/posts/Study-says-one-wipe-cleaning-system-for-nurses-is-effective–20336

Surface Damage and its implications for healthcare facilities

Preventing and controlling the spread of contamination and infection is of very high importance for healthcare facilities, and it is safe to say that many measures have already been taken in order to reach these goals. However, like many things, there is still much room for improvement moreover when it is about surface damage.

medical equipment surface damage

Source: Shaw Air Force Base

Evidently healthcare facilities use a wide variety of equipment, from monitors to surgical instruments to cleaning tools, and over time, this equipment wears down. Sometimes, equipment will break completely and be unusable, however sometimes there will only be a few scratches or other small damage.  But what happens when these scratches or other forms of damage become shelters and areas of growth for microorganisms? This is an example of how surface damage may not only impede the prevention of bacteria growth, but also provide the microorganisms with a place to grow.

What is surface damage?

According to Infection Control Today, surface damage is defined as:

a quantifiable physical or chemical change from the original manufactured state of an object (surface or device).

While it is recognized that surface damage of medical equipment poses a potential threat in the spread of bacteria in healthcare facilities, there is no standardized method for healthcare workers to determine what is considered surface damage, and at what point the damage is likely to cause the spread of bacteria. In a later blog post, I will discuss the ideal surface damage testing protocol, proposed by Peter Teska et al. in “Infection Control Today.” In this article, the authors discuss ideal methods of avoiding the problems that surface damage presents.

Are your surfaces damaged?

At Lalema, when we talk about hygiene and cleanliness, we offer a wide range of technical and consulting services. Find out more.

You can also read this article about The complete guide for hospital cleanliness.

Source: Infection Control Today. Vol. 21. No. 12. January 2018.

How often should I clean this or that?

I develop maintenance program for my clients and the question that comes up most often is:
“How often should I clean this or that?”

clean

How often should I clean this?

Here is a non-exhaustive list of 16 surfaces to clean regularly at home.

Item Frequency Tips
1. Cellular phone

Daily Wipe with a microfiber glass cloth to remove any greasy substances and germs
2. Kitchen Counter

Daily Use a mild all purpose cleaner. When using a disinfectant cleaner, rinse the surface.
3. Dishwasher

Monthly Use specially designed capsules or a little bit of baking soda and vinegar and the trick is done.
4. Refrigerator

Quarterly To avoid the appearance of mold and other undesirable contents, empty and clean the shelves and containers.
5. Kitchen floor

Weekly Use a broom after each meal and a good damp mopping every week.
6. Carpets

Weekly Vacuuming carpets every week will even reduce allergies. Remove the dog and the baby before to do so!
7. Furniture

Monthly Vacuum furniture and fabrics every month and steam clean annually
8. Remote control or joystick

Weekly Remove the batteries, clean the remote control surface by rubbing the buttons and gaps.
9. Ceiling fans

Quarterly With an all purpose cleaner, wipe the blades. Do not forget to turn off the fan!
10. Window blinds

Quarterly Dust and clean batten by batten with soapy water and a soft cloth.
11. Toilet

Daily Brush daily and thoroughly clean once a week.
12. Towels

After some use After the shower or the bath, hang to dry and use a few times (3 or 4 times), then machine wash. Note: If you have teenagers, this thing may not work!
13. Shower curtain

Monthly Spray a bathroom cleaner to remove residual accumulated soaps and limescale.
14. Bed linen

Weekly Wash in warm water to remove bacteria and mites. Avoid eating in your bed!
15. Mattress

Biannual Vacuum the mattress twice a year to remove dead skin cells and mites.
16. Air filter

Monthly Changing air filters every month or as recommended by the manufacturer contributes to a healthy environment.

We have the tools to clean

At Lalema, we serve a large industrial and institutional clientele with an online catalog of more than 18000 products ! Come and have a look!

www.lalema.com

 

Source :

inspired from http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/ss/slideshow-how-often-clean-this.

Photos are owned by me or from various talended photographs via unsplash.com

Safe hand soap: a primer

hand soapHandwashing is the single most important action to break down the transmission of infection. Anyone working in the food industry, in a lab or in healthcare environment will tell you how often they have to wash their hands. So many products are available, however, it is clear that not all product were created equal. Multiple claims are often written on the bottle confusing users and buyers. A lack of regulation is seen. However, recently the American FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and Health Canada seems to be going toward new regulation in order to increase the safety of hand soaps.

FDA bans Triclosan

The American FDA (Food and Drug Administration) banned the use of Triclosan and 18 other chemicals in consumer hand soap. The decision was based on the lack of information regarding the effectiveness of this product compare to regular handwashing. Also, serious doubt concerning the safety of this product was crucial in the decision process. The debate has been going on for a while before the decision was made.

Health Canada identified risk regarding Methylisothiazolinone

According to Health Canada, the repeated exposure to this substance and its derivatives can generate multiple symptoms including:

  • a red rash or bumps;
  • itching;
  • swelling, burning, or tenderness of the skin;
  • dry, cracked or scaly skin;
  • blisters.

These symptoms may occur each time someone uses a product containing Methylisothiazolinone and its derivatives and may become more severe with repeated use.

Multiple solutions exist

Hopefully, many suppliers offer products without triclosan, paraben, methylisothiazolinone, benzalkonium chloride, polyacrylamide, dioxane, nonylphenol ethoxylated alcohol or any chemicals of concern. Ask you supplier what are the options regarding safe hand soap, it might save you a lot of trouble.

 

Reference:

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm378393.htm

http://canadiensensante.gc.ca/recall-alert-rappel-avis/hc-sc/2016/58290a-fra.php